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        Objectivity and Infinite Graph

        Analysis of object-oriented DBMS vendor Objectivity and its products, especially graph database product Infinite Graph. Related subjects include:

        May 7, 2012

        Terminology: Relationship analytics

        This post is part of a series on managing and analyzing graph data. Posts to date include:

        In late 2005, I encountered a company called Cogito that was using a graphical data manager to analyze relationships. They called this “relational analytics”, which I thought was a terrible name for something that they were trying to claim should NOT be done in a relational DBMS. On the spot, I coined relationship analytics as an alternative. A business relationship ensued, which included a short white paper. Cogito didn’t do so well, however, and for a while the term “relationship analytics” faltered too. But recently it’s made a bit of a comeback, having been adopted by Objectivity, Qlik Tech, Yarcdata and others.

        “Relationship analytics” is not a perfect name, both because it’s longish and because it might over-connote a social-network focus. But then, no other term would be perfect either. So we might as well stick with it.

        In that case, “relationship analytics” could use an actual definition, preferably one a little heftier than just:

        Analytics on graphs.

        Read more

        July 22, 2011

        McObject and eXtremeDB

        I talked with McObject yesterday. McObject has two product lines, both of which are something like in-memory DBMS — eXtremeDB, which is the main one, and Perst. McObject has been around since at least 2003, probably has no venture capital, and probably has a very low double-digit number of employees.*

        *I could be wrong in those guesses; as small companies go, McObject is unusually prone to secrecy games.

        As best I understand:

        My guess three years ago that eXtremeDB might emerge as an alternative to solidDB seems to have been borne out. McObject CEO Steve Graves says that the core of McObject’s business is OEMs, in sectors such as telecom equipment and defense/aerospace. That’s exactly solidDB’s traditional market, except that solidDB got acquired by IBM and deemphasized it.

        I’ve said before that if I were starting a SaaS effort — and it wasn’t just focused on analytics — I’d look at using a memory-centric OODBMS. Perhaps eXtremeDB is worth looking at in such scenarios.

        May 21, 2011

        Object-oriented database management systems (OODBMS)

        There seems to be a fair amount of confusion about object-oriented database management systems (OODBMS). Let’s start with a working definition:

        An object-oriented database management system (OODBMS, but sometimes just called “object database”) is a DBMS that stores data in a logical model that is closely aligned with an application program’s object model. Of course, an OODBMS will have a physical data model optimized for the kinds of logical data model it expects.

        If you’re guessing from that definition that there can be difficulties drawing boundaries between the application, the application programming language, the data manipulation language, and/or the DBMS — you’re right. Those difficulties have been a big factor in relegating OODBMS to being a relatively niche technology to date.

        Examples of what I would call OODBMS include:? Read more

        July 30, 2010

        Advice for some non-clients

        Edit: Any further anonymous comments to this post will be deleted. Signed comments are permitted as always.

        Most of what I get paid for is in some form or other consulting. (The same would be true for many other analysts.) And so I can be a bit stingy with my advice toward non-clients. But my non-clients are a distinguished and powerful group, including in their number Oracle, IBM, Microsoft, and most of the BI vendors. So here’s a bit of advice for them too.

        Oracle. On the plus side, you guys have been making progress against your reputation for untruthfulness. Oh, I’ve dinged you for some past slip-ups, but on the whole they’ve been no worse than other vendors.’ But recently you pulled a doozy. The analyst reports section of your website fails to distinguish between unsponsored and sponsored work.* That is a horrible ethical stumble. Fix it fast. Then put processes in place to ensure nothing that dishonest happens again for a good long time.

        *Merv Adrian’s “report” listed high on that page is actually a sponsored white paper. That Merv himself screwed up by not labeling it clearly as such in no way exonerates Oracle. Besides, I’m sure Merv won’t soon repeat the error — but for Oracle, this represents a whole pattern of behavior.

        Oracle. And while I’m at it, outright dishonesty isn’t your only unnecessary credibility problem. You’re also playing too many games in analyst relations.

        HP. Neoview will never succeed. Admit it to yourselves. Go buy something that can.? Read more

        June 19, 2010

        Objectivity Infinite Graph

        I chatted Wednesday night with Darren Wood, the Australia-based lead developer of Objectivity’s Infinite Graph database product. Background includes:

        Infinite Graph is an API or language binding on top of Objectivity that:

        Read more

        October 4, 2009

        Jacek Becla on issues in scientific data management

        Just as Martin Kersten did, Jacek Becla emailed a response to my post on issues in scientific data management. With his permission, I’ve lightly edited his email too, and am posting it below, with some interspersed comments of my own. Read more

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